The Aftermath of Trauma

The infographic below illustrates why healing trauma is not “one size fits all”. The aftermath of trauma can vary widely. In coming weeks I will explore each section and discuss a little of what is needed to heal each set of symptoms.

 

Sexual Abuse-Healing the Aftermath

Healing and the Aftermath

Sexual abuse creates long term problems for many people, which may not show up until years after the abuse. Abuse can be open or subtle, can be part of a “special relationship” or secrecy. The victim may be blamed by the abuser for the abuse, or worse, be told that this is “love” or that they somehow  “deserve” the abuse.

ABUSE IS NOT LOVE!

Ross and Halpern (2009) describe many of the effects of  childhood sexual abuse. Abuse impacts the development of the sexual and personal identity of the victim in profound ways, even if the survivor can’t remember the abuse at all. Common problems include a sense of discomfort with one’s femininity, masculinity or other orientations, being uncomfortable in one’s body, hypersexual or hyposexual behaviour, alteration in how a person dresses or grooms, sexual addictions, anxiety, depression, dissociation, or confusion around sexual orientation.

On the emotional level, there is often self -blame, self- doubt or self- attack. People wonder if there is “something wrong” with them (shame or guilt). There may be fear of sexual arousal or the content of sexual fantasies. People often question whether their fantasies or behaviors are normal. Others avoid sexuality and intimacy to protect themselves. Others may dissociate from their body altogether and become a “walking head” as a survival based response.

Adding to this, any form of sexual contact, even sexual thoughts, can trigger anxiety, guilt, shame or flashbacks of past abuse. This can be frightening and distressing for the person. The situation may also be distressing for their partner who may be the unwilling, and often unknowing, catalyst for flashbacks, and who may be cast in the role of the perpetrator. This puts painful strain on both people in the relationship.

Some people do not have flashbacks but instead experience a range of problems with arousal, orgasm, or have other difficulties with sex. Boundaries with others may be confused. Intimacy or connection become complicated. Some experience gender dysphoria or gender identity confusion. Others may be fused with their partner and find it difficult to say “no” or to be an individual, while others convince themselves they don’t need anyone. Trust is often be a major issue.

Miraculously, I have seen many people with symptoms of trauma like this make changes, even late in life, that transform and heal many of the problems above. The journey to healing can be slow, but hope is always possible. People experiencing any of the problems above should seek professional help, from a trauma specialist or the Blue Knot Foundation.

Adapted from: Ross and Halpern (2009) “Trauma model therapy, a treatment approach for trauma, dissociation and complex comorbidity”, TX:Manitou Communications Inc.

Understanding high risk behaviours

Understanding Self Harm, Addictions or Repeated Suicide behaviours in Complex Trauma

By Janina Fisher, Adapted by Claire Hudson-McAuley 2015,

As we know from the work of Bessel van der Kolk, Onno van der Hart, Bruce Perry, and the ACES study, childhood trauma dramatically interferes with the body’s ability to function and regulate itself mentally, emotionally and somatically.

The profound impact of trauma alters perception, thinking, tolerance of uncomfortable emotions, basic bodily functions such as digestion and respiration, hormonal and metabolic processes,  immune function, and the expression of genes. Relationships with others and self, trust, the ability to function in everyday life, and even the ability to learn are compromised.

Psychological development is delayed or distorted, and identity formation proceeds along the “fault lines” that result from dissociative defences and compartmentalization. Is it then any wonder that adult survivors of trauma become so remarkably adept at inventing compensatory strategies aimed at survival and  self-regulation long before they enter the doors of our offices, hospitals, or clinics?

 

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